Grenfell Tower fire survivors given just £10 to live on, volunteer says

The fire that spread swiftly, devouring everything in its path, has killed at least 30 people, with more than 70 still unaccounted for, according to the police.

Earlier, a sign at a Tube station said that the service suspension was because of the “safety” of nearby Grenfell Tower, suggesting structural concerns.

Ya-Haddy Sisi Saye, also known as Khadija Saye, 24, Abufars Ibrahim, 39, and Anthony Disson, 65, all lived in the 24-storey block, which was destroyed by a huge blaze last Wednesday in west London.

As NPR’s Merrit Kennedy reported, the Grenfell Tower fire has aroused the ire of those who feel it was caused by corporate malfeasance and who feel Prime Minister Theresa May’s government is not doing enough to respond.

High-rise tower blocks dating from the 1960s and 1970s could be torn down in the wake of the deadly Grenfell Tower fire, London mayor Sadiq Khan said.

Members of the emergency services work inside burnt out remains of the Grenfell apartment tower in North Kensington, London, Britain, June 18, 2017.

Mrs May met with survivors and victims’ families in Downing Street today.

“The figure of 58 are those who are missing and that we have to presume are dead”, said Cundy.

Prime Minister Theresa May has been criticised for her muted response to the fire and had to be rushed away from a meeting with residents on Friday under heavy police guard as protesters shouted “Shame on you”.

“I believe there may be people who were in Grenfell Tower that people may not know were missing and may not have realised they were in there on the night”. Help will also be given to people who do not have bank accounts.

Earlier, hundreds gathered at the town hall, where scores forced their way into the building, to deliver a list of demands, including the immediate rehousing of all victims within the borough.

Meanwhile, Queen Elizabeth II struck a mournful tone in an address to mark her official birthday Saturday, remarking not only on the blaze at the high-rise building but also on the recent terrorist attacks in Manchester and London.

There are questions about why the block was not fitted with sprinklers or a central smoke alarm, as well as whether the recent refurbishment – including the use of cladding that was blamed for worsening previous building fires in France, the United Arab Emirates and Australia – helped fuel the flames. “It’s absolutely shocking”, she said.

The money will be taken from the Government’s £5 million emergency fund which they pledged would be spent on aid, clothing and food for the victims. More than 3 million pounds ($3.8 million) have been raised for the victims.

He said residents are “angry not simply at the poor response in the days afterwards from the council and the government, but the years of neglect from the council and successive governments”.

Around 70 people are missing, according to Britain’s Press Association, and identification of the victims is proving very hard.

The 91-year-old monarch said it is “difficult to escape a very sombre mood” on what is normally a day of celebration.

The government has promised a full public inquiry.